Xamarin.Forms And The Case of Failed NuGet Packages – Part 2

Most enterprise mobile apps require enterprise-level authentication mechanism. In that case, people use tried and tested Active Directory Authentication Library (ADAL) or Microsoft Authentication Library (MSAL). ADAL is in GA and it works fine with cross-platform mobile apps built using Xamarin. However, MSAL is in ‘preview’ and it offers nightly builds to try out. I wanted to try the latest nightly build (ver: 1.1.1-alpha0417) as it uses updated Android Support Package and old preview bits of MSAL (ver: 1.1.0-preview) were not compatible with latest  Xamarin.Forms anymore. Here, I was trying to build one app over holidays and I got stuck on one interesting issue. Let’s discuss it in this blog post.

The Problem:

When you create a blank Xamarin.Forms app, it automatically references Xamarin.Forms NuGet along with all the required dependencies.

At this time, when you’ll try to install MSAL, you may get stuck at this issue of versioning.

The reason being Xamarin.Forms NuGet requires a specific version of Android Support Packages whereas Microsoft Authentication Library requires anything above Ver. 25.3.1.

The Solution:

Sometimes, things are very simpler than it looks. I spent a lot of time on solving this issue but was unable to fix it. Thanks to my friend Nish, who helped me with his ‘ problem-solving skills’ and we got this working.

The solution is simple:

  1. Remove all NuGet packages from Android project. For the sake of it, close and restart Visual Studio.
  2. Open the solution and Install MSAL NuGet package first.
  3. After installing MSAL NuGet, install Xamarin.Forms NuGet package.


Now you can build Xamarin.Forms apps with Microsoft Authentication Library. If you want to know more about how to use the SDK, follow the blog post here on Xamarin blog.

Even though I’m talking about Xamarin.Forms and MSAL here, this blog post is very much applicable wherever you’re trying to use any NuGet package which has updated dependency on Android Support Package.

Setup info:
Visual Studio Enterprise 2017 Preview (15.5.2)
Xamarin (
Xamarin.Forms (
Microsoft Authentication Library (1.1.1-alpha0417)

Mayur Tendulkar



Learn Mobile App Dev & Mobile DevOps Here

DevOps Meme

My friend Prachi tagged me on this meme on Facebook and I couldn’t agree more with her. When I started my career, my entire version control was folders – zipped, tagged and stored on multiple hard-disks. But then things changed. My guru Raj, enlightened me about advantages of version control systems. I learned about how multiple people can collaborate on projects or how errors can be reversed by going through code history if version controls like Team Foundation Server or GitHub are used. I started using those and these days, all my projects and samples are either in Visual Studio Team Services or in GitHub repository.  Going one step ahead, I’m using Visual Studio Mobile Center for DevOps along with these version control systems.

But what is this all about? How it helps in building successful mobile applications? And I thought about answering these questions in a video series. The goal is to explain mobile DevOps and different steps in mobile DevOps in small (less than 10 mins) videos.  After completing this series, you’ll be able to build cross-platform Xamarin.Forms mobile application, which will consume Microsoft Cognitive Service and set-up mobile DevOps for the same.

To follow along with this series, I’m recommending following minimum hardware/software combination:

  • Intel i5, 8GB, 50GB machine with Hyper-V support & Windows 10 Professional
  • MacBook or MacMini with i5, 4GB, 50GB for compiling iOS apps
  • Visual Studio 2017 Community Preview

With these hardware/software additional services used in this series are:

Watch the 1st video here about activating these tools & services to set-up mobile DevOps.

In 2nd video learn about how to setup build automation, using Visual Studio Mobile Center.

I’ll update this blog post in coming weeks with the 3rd video in this series, which will be about building mobile applications.

Stay tuned and subscribe to my blog/channel :)

Mayur Tendulkar

Updating Mobile Development Environment

On 20th July, Microsoft released Visual Studio 2015. This release of Visual Studio includes improvements in terms of IDE features, Language features and even changes in underlying .NET framework. Along with this, Microsoft is also releasing Windows 10 on 29th July, which will add Universal Windows Platform (UWP) development capabilities to Visual Studio. In this blog post, I’m going to cover the features that are most important for us i.e. mobile developers. Having said that, if you want to build UWP apps on RTM, hold on till July 29th, as the SDK and tooling for UWP will be released on the same day. You can find that information here.

Install Selection

You can think Visual Studio 2015 as the most complete mobile development IDE. You can build any kind of mobile applications which can run on Android, iOS and Windows devices. To setup your environment for mobile development, while installing itself, make sure you select your required tools. For example, here I’ve selected Xamarin tools to build native mobile applications. In this case, Visual Studio will install the necessary SDKs and libraries e.g. Android SDKs & NDKs with different API levels, Java SDK, etc…

VS 2015 Install

If you’re already a Xamarin developer, you may want to install Xamarin Studio, which needs to be installed separately by downloading Xamarin Installer from the site. With open sourcing of .NET and Roslyn, even Xamarin Studio is using some of its benefits. You can read more about it from Miguel’s blog.

Xamarin Integration & Project Template

Previously (VS 2013 or prior), you had to install Xamarin to get Xamarin specific project templates. With VS2015, if you select above option during install, you’ll have Xamarin project templates in File > New Project Dialog.

VS 2015 Project Templates

Note: The difference between Blank App (Native Portable) & Blank App (Xamarin.Forms Portable) is literal. That means, later one has Xamarin.Forms NuGet and integration in all projects. First one, just creates 4 separate projects without Xamarin.Forms dependencies.

When you create a Xamarin project, Visual Studio will ask you to sign into your Xamarin account to use different features according to license.

VS 2015 Xamarin

Developer (aka God) Mode

As I mentioned above, if you want to build UWP apps on RTM, you’ll need to wait till 29th July. And to enable Windows Store apps development and debugging on your machine, you’ll need to enable a ‘Developer Mode’. When you create a new project you’ll get following dialog which can take you to next dialog, where you need to select ‘Developer Mode’ and you should be able to test your apps. Do the same thing in your Windows 10 mobile device, if you want to debug apps directly on mobile.

VS 2015 - Developer Mode

VS 2015 - Developer Mode Enabled

Accessing Tools

This is not new as such to Visual Studio 2015, but I want to add it here for your reference. You can find all the tools and setting related to Xamarin and mobility under Tools menu. So, if you want to download new API Level (for example Android M Preview) or monitor your Android app’s performance on device using Android Device Monitor, you know where to look for. We’ll cover tools and features exclusive for Windows 10 in next post.

VS 2015 Tools

By the way, if you ever face any issues with Xamarin and need to contact support, Xamarin logs can help you to share more information about your issues with Support guys. Even, you can go through them and find issues/reasons. You can find them easily under Help > Xamarin

If you want to check where exactly platform SDKs are installed, you can find in Tools > Options and at two different selections

VS 2015 - SDK Location - 1

VS 2015 - SDK Location - 2

More Resources

Now, if you want to know more about Visual Studio 2015 and .NET Framework, Microsoft Channel 9 has Connect On-Demand series on it. Some of the most important videos are here

What’s new in C# 6
New Coding Experiences for C# and Visual Basic
What’s New for .NET 2015
Developing iOS and Android Apps in C# with Visual Studio
Xamarin.Forms: Leaveraging XAML to Build iOS, Android, and Windows Apps
Wearables in C#: Highlighting Apple Watch, Android Wear, and Microsoft Band
GitHub Extensions for Visual Studio

I’ll update tendulkar-uvāca series with new tools and technologies once they are released i.e. after 29th July. Till then, download the Visual Studio 2015 and enjoy the new IDE & tooling.

By the way, have I told you: You get Visual Studio 2015 Community Edition free for specific use cases and along with it, you get Xamarin Starter for free. If you’re a student, you can get more benefit through Microsoft DreamSpark program.

Mayur Tendulkar



Plugin 05: Accelerometer

In our series on plugins, today we’re going to cover plugin which can help us to work with Accelerometer sensor. This sensor is responsible to detect X, Y, Z co-ordinates of the devices. Using data received from this sensor, you can build games like TempleRun, where users can collect the coins by tilting the device.

There are different APIs for different platform and their usage is different too. First, lets see how we can use this sensor in different platform and then we’ll use plugin in Xamarin.Forms application.

Being Windows Runtime API, the API and its usage is same in Windows and Windows Phone. Here, you create object of the sensor and register for ‘ReadingChanged’ event. Whenever device position is changed, it is reported through that event and UI can be updated using Dispatcher.

In case of Android, it is again similar to Windows platform. Create object of SensorManager and register for SensorChanged event.

iOS is not any different. You create object of CMMotionManager and then listen to sensor for changes.

As you can see, for three different platforms the APIs are totally different. But with Plugins for Xamarin.Forms it becomes easy. You can use DeviceMotion plugin which can work across all these platforms. And the code for same looks like:

In this series on plugin we’ve seen how particular concept can be implemented in all the three platforms and how we can use plugin to make life easier. This will be be last post in this series, but there are many plugins available which you can explore and use in your projects. Do let me know if you want to cover any specific plugin. We’ll start with a new series in couple of weeks. Till then… happy coding :)

Mayur Tendulkar


Plugin 04: FileIO

In continuation to blog posts in this series on plugins, today we’ll cover a plugin/library to perform FileIO.

There are different APIs on different platforms to perform FileIO. Having said that, Xamarin already makes life easier by implementing System.IO which is available in Android and iOS.

Following code can be used in Android to create a file and then read contents from it.FileIO - Android

Similarly, following code can be used in case of iOS application. FileIO - iOS

In case of Windows, using WinRT APIs, the case is little bit different as shown below:FileIO - Windows

Now to make life easier, there is a NuGet from Daniel Plaisted, which can help you to use same code on different platforms. You can find more information about the library from here: https://www.nuget.org/packages/PCLStorage/FileIO - Forms

This way, you can use one code (in C#) across all the three different platforms.

Hope you’re enjoying this series. Do let me know your feedback if you want to include any specific libraries/features.

Mayur Tendulkar


Revisiting Evolve – Insights

One of the factor for successful app is – continuous feedback from user. Even though, you anticipate all the possible bugs, once the app is on store, you’ll never know what can go wrong and when your app can crash on the user. You may want to know: how many users are using your app, when they are using, how they are using, what features they are using or if the app crashes, when, why and how it crashed. These analytics can help you to engage more with the audience and deliver great apps.
Thanks to Xamarin Insights, which was introduced in Evolve 2014. Using Insights, you can easily track down all these scenarios.
To get started visit https://insights.xamarin.com/ and create a new app.



Insights is supported on Android, iOS and Windows/Phone apps. Using NuGet package, add Xamarin.Insights NuGet Package.



Once you add this package, you need to initialise the Xamarin.Insights by using following code:


Just remember, you need to initialise Insights before any exception can occur. For example, in case of iOS in Main, in case of Android in OnCreate of startup activity and in case of Windows in Launch event.
After this, whenever there will be any unhandled exception, it will be reported on the dashboard. To simulate this behaviour, lets add a button on screen and catch the exception and report it explicitly.


As you can see, above code will raise IndexOutOfRangeException. Now, if you run the app in ‘release’ mode on ‘device’, it should show all these exceptions on Dashboard.


Now, if you click on individual exception, you can see more details (incl. stack-trace) for that exception. This will also tell you more details about device on which app is running, the version of the device OS and other details.



On this dashboard, you can go to Users tab and see individual user actions and how they received those exceptions.



Insights give you APIs to report more details related to Users (individual user details like name, email id, etc…), their actions or traits (clicked on some button, navigated to some tabs, etc…) and also to add more details to exceptions. It can also send you email for individual issues. So, if there is any issue with high-priority, you’ll receive a notification mail and get notified about it. Insights, also allows you to integrate with HipChat, Jira, Visual Studio Online to get notified about issues.
Using Insights, you can easily engage more with your audience. If user is facing any issues, you can get notified about those issues. And once you solve those issues, you can contact user about updates. This will help your users to use your app more frequently while making it a successful app.
You can find more details about Insights at: https://insights.xamarin.com/docs or http://xamarin.com/insights
Hope to see more apps with Insights and user engagement.

Mayur Tendulkar


It’s All About Controls (Part 2)

Thanks for reading Part 1 of this multi-part blog post. If you’ve missed, in Part 1, we talked about what has been added (or converged with Windows) in Windows Phone 8.1 SDK. This part will mainly cover the changes that are included in this SDK. These are important changes and you must make a note of it to build stunning apps. Perhaps, later, there will be part 3, in which I’ll cover some 3rd party components, which can be used in Universal apps. Do let me know if you want to cover anything specific.

Panorama Is Now Hub

wp_ss_20140421_0003 wp_ss_20140421_00014

With Windows and Windows Phone convergence, Panorama control from Windows Phone is changed to Hub control. It is similar to Hub control available on Windows and gives effects like Panorama. It also, share the same XAML in both the platforms



StatusBar (SystemTray) Changes

StatusBar or SystemTray is top-most component on page, which shows various details:


In Windows Phone 8 apps, you could show/hide system tray from XAML. For example:


Now, in 8.1 (WinRT) apps you’ll need to use code behind to do it. For example:


Flyouts, Flyouts Everywhere

Flyout is a new control in WP8.1 SDK. As MSDN says, use it to display lightweight UI. Also, unlike a dialog, a flyout can be lightly dismissed by clicking or tapping outside it. You can create a flyout by using following code. And actually add a flyout to any control which is a FrameworkElement.



Command From Your Bar

With WP8.1, you do get your old AppBar.. but also get CommandBar. This command bar shares code with Windows. It also have Primary Commands and Secondary Commands. Which represents main buttons and menu on bottom app-bar in WP app. Whereas, on Windows, they have positions on app-bar as left and right.



Zoom – SemanticZoom

With WP8.1, LongListSelector is gone. However, it is replaced with SemanticZoom – in convergence with Windows. This control actually has two views which are shown in different way according to Zoom In/Out mode. It will be another topic for blog. But to put it into simple words: you’ll see a large list of photos in Grid. But when you *squeeze* it, you’ll see a list. OR vice a versa as you design your view.


With these controls, there are some more changes in controls are added. Like RichTextBLOCK (not Box), WebView (not Browser). But I would love to keep this post short.  

In next series (rather, I’m planning to change the name Smile), I’m going to talk about API changes in Windows Phone 8.1 SDK. Meanwhile, do let me know your feedback and if you want anything more covered here.

Happy Coding

Mayur Tendulkar